50 In Anatomy of an Outfit/ Styling Tips

How to Dress the Chest When There’s a Problem

Carefree with added scarf

Adding the navy scarf makes me scar-carefree

 

I came up with a couple of angles when I decided to share this Anatomy of an Outfit. In the end, I decided to go with the most personal explanation. This outfit actually took me less than five minutes to create, but it made me aware of a problem I’d been having with this top and a simple way to fix it.

The not so secret outfit details start with the choosing of this excellent Halogen top that I bought back in February from Nordstrom when it was in the mid-70s here in Sonoma. I needed something cool to wear in our unusually hot February.

I liked it for four solid reasons:

  1. It’s pretty loose so on a hot day, this top keeps me from feeling sticky.
  2. I was so darn hungry for a bold floral print, and when I found this one, I was sold.
  3. I desperately needed flirty, fun tops in my wardrobe. I loved the non-traditional sleeves and the ruffled/ruched/ grosgrain ribbon-tied details instead.
  4. For not a lot of money, I was about to enjoy my favorite trend of the winter season: large floral prints on dark backgrounds. It looked more expensive than it actually was.

This day in August, the weather was perfect for this top, especially if I added a scarf around the neck (which proved to be the about-to-be-revealed problem solver) as it was a tad chilly outside. I paired it with my skinny AG deep indigo jeans and made a nearly five-inch deep cuff at the bottom. I didn’t like it straight, I didn’t like it rolled two or three times making a thinner cuff; I loved it just this way. The proportion was just right.

I love how the black background in this print is close in color to the dark indigo jeans. I’m getting a lean column of color expect that the top half of the column has flowers on it. I added the neutral colored Camper sandals to call out the lighter peachy-blush color in the top.

Red-coral eyeglass frames are great with the orange-coral part of the print, and my orange lipstick pulls the colors up as well. Win/win, right?

 

Jean outfits

All smiles when I’m not thinking about my clothes

 

Not so fast. The reason this top hasn’t been getting much use this summer is that it had a problem to begin with: the broad and rather deep (for me) v-neck. I bought it knowing I’d have to either work with it creatively or keep pulling the top down in back to raise the neckline in front. Why am I fussy about this? I have skin damage from going through radiation fourteen years ago. I don’t feel that bad about it, but I don’t advertise it either.

I tried to think of a way to explain it to you without showing it all. The left side is where I had the mastectomy. Radiation came after the surgery, and it left tons of redness all over the area where the breast once was, plus the red parts leaked further up my chest. It’s like you were ironing a top, but the iron was too hot for the fabric, and the material got scorched. My chest wall on the left is scorched. Without the scarf, those leaky red parts reveal that something’s different there.

I don’t want to answer questions about it. I don’t want to spend time wondering if it’s showing. But you know these flowing tops, they can shift around your body and relocate before you even notice it.

 

Wide v-neck is too revealing

Wide v-neck puts my damaged skin on display

 

My family members are spotters. If I’m wearing something and you can start to see that area, Russ or one of the girls will mention it. It’s just a courtesy thing like when I’m wearing black pants, and they say, “Did you know you have cat hair all over butt?” It gives me a chance to do something about it.

If I’m wearing something with buttons, it’s easy. Just button another button!

 

A buttoned tunic helps

One chest fix is to button another button

 

Another thing I’ve done is added something flashy to my neckline so the eye goes to the flash first, or if I’m lucky, they don’t look beyond the necklace at all.

This was a silk dress I bought on sale. I had to have it because of the colors and the feel of the fabric, and yes, the sale price was terrific. It had that fuller “v” which made me nervous. Sometimes I say, “I don’t care” and just will people to look at my face instead.

 

A fanciful necklace fills in the neck

Using a dazzling necklace to grab attention away from skin damage

 

Other times, it’s just not worth that kind of effort, so I wear higher v-neck tops so you don’t see it at all.

 

Higher v-neck tops solve the problem

Higher v-neck tops are best

 

Another lovely shopping moment is when I find a v-neck that’s skinny, like this Vince Camuto floral print top. I have a scarf around the neck, but I wouldn’t have to.

 

Skinny v-necks are confidence builders

Finding a friendly neckline in this skinny “V”

 

Navy scarf is the secret solution

Navy scarf adds flair and confidence

 

By adding this navy scarf to my neck, I got a solution and bonus points. The solution is that with the scarf tied the way it is, loose and casually, it covers that area I’d prefer to be concealed. I love that it’s navy and pulls in the color of the indigo pants. It’s a snappy style detail. And the real bonus points come in that this scarf belonged to Mother. After she died, I went through her scarves and brought home a few.

She called me Babe. I can hear her say, “Oh Babe, no one would ever know. You look great.” She knows my secret and now so do you!

 

Vince Camuto top

Cheering on the chest

 

I feel great in this outfit. I feel flirty, fun, confident, and not once am I thinking about myself. I’m just getting on with the day in Petaluma, having brunch with Russ, hanging out at Copperfield’s Books, and visiting my friend Nancy who owns Uber Optics where I get my glasses from.

That’s what clothes are there for, to help speak to your style, keep you comfortable, give you the chance to show what you want to show and keep some things to yourself as desired.

I have clients who choose to wear long skirts to cover varicose veins. I have a friend and colleague who is bow-legged and wears bootcut jeans instead of skinny jeans as she wants to keep that info to herself.

How about you? Have you found some ways to work around any body issues you face? Sharing your tips could help others. How about we have a public service fashion share right here? I’d love to hear from you!

XO

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50 Comments

  • Reply
    Liz2
    August 27, 2018 at 4:49 pm

    The scarf is flattering and elongating, as well as making the outfit look more finished. Regarding the top, I’ve always loved floral prints on a dark background.
    Do any of you remember the Betsy McCall paper doll that was in McCall’s magazines back in the 60s? My favorite paper doll dress had colorful flowers on a black background.
    I tend to wear clothing that covers what I don’t like, but I often admire women who don’t feel they need to hide things. They’re beautiful just as they are. Unfortunately, our society seems to be more accepting of variations in other aspects than they are in regard to personal appearance.

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 27, 2018 at 5:48 pm

      Yes, I think you’re right about acceptance. But I also would imagine it varies from one part of the country/world to another. I’m really trying to remember those paper dolls! I can never remember a month at our house without a McCall’s magazine! I wonder if I’d have appreciated that floral print then as much as I do now. You have quite the memory!

  • Reply
    Diane
    August 27, 2018 at 5:28 pm

    Very brave of you to put it all out there. The scarf looks great with the top and jeans. Your new hair cut is cute. I used to have one like it, then decided to let the curls grow for a while. I have had 4 surgeries on my left leg and for the longest time would make sure the biggest scars were always covered, but lately if my skirts don’t cover completely it doesn’t bother me so much. Just another imperfect part of me….battle scars that show I have lived. Wish we had some cooler weather so I could start to get the scarves out. Soon I hope.

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 27, 2018 at 5:46 pm

      I like that attitude: if it covers, okay, and if it doesn’t, okay. I’m grateful for these “battle scars” for several reasons. It makes me compassionate when clients have things they feel self-conscious about. And of course, they prove that we are here and alive and that’s a grand thing! Thanks, Diane!

  • Reply
    Alice Webb
    August 27, 2018 at 6:16 pm

    Flat butt, long shirts! I also do a half tuck in front to show a cute belt, leaving shirt tails out behind and add detail on top to draw the eye up.

  • Reply
    Maggie
    August 28, 2018 at 5:53 am

    Hi Brenda,

    Thanks for today’s post! I am petite but busty for my frame and I have issues with a v neck being too low or too wide.

    Maybe you could add some beaded trim or velvet ribbon to the edge of the neckline to make it a little smaller? Also, you could add a triangle of fabric at the bottom instead of wearing a camisole or scarf. You could add snaps or a little button with a loop if you don’t want to be able to remove it. Another option is to take it up at the shoulders. I can’t tell if the neckline has facing or is just turned under. (You could remove the facing and use the facing fabric to make a self binding on the neck.)

    Regards,
    Maggie

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 28, 2018 at 11:02 am

      There’s a sewer amongst us! Loving all these ideas, Maggie!

      • Reply
        Maggie
        August 31, 2018 at 5:56 am

        Hi Brenda,
        I am glad that you liked my ideas! If you add trim at the neck, you could add it on the bottom as well or up the side seams of the torso just to tie it in. Lace, eyelet, or contrasting print in the neckline would be pretty too!

        I have discovered that a medium scale print works pretty well on top as long as the fabric is fluid.

        I have never been a fan of florals because they always seemed to be cabbage roses or pink/mint green. I have seen florals in the past 5 years that I like and have bought a few blouses in watercolor or bolder prints that look good on me without resorting to ruffles or pastels.

        Regards,
        Maggie

        • Reply
          Brenda
          September 4, 2018 at 11:05 am

          I’m totally with you on being more of a recent convert. Most of the floral patterns I saw were in color themes that just didn’t work with my coloring. I always rejected them for myself. But now….!!! So many more choices. Thanks for your great tips!

  • Reply
    jodie filogomo
    August 28, 2018 at 5:55 am

    I wish I could cover my cleft lip scar so easily….:) But I use make up and other statement pieces to draw the eye away from the area. I never used to wear bright lipstick because of it, but I’ve decided life is too short.
    So have you ever tried to wear the shirt backwards?? Or is it the same that way?? It’s such a lovely print Brenda!!!
    XOXO
    Jodie
    http://www.jtouchofstyle.com

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 28, 2018 at 11:04 am

      Good for you for suggesting it be worn backwards! No, I like how it falls and with the scarf added for beauty and function, I quite like it as it is. I never ever noticed your scar. Wear bright lipstick!

  • Reply
    Terri
    August 28, 2018 at 6:06 am

    I have a surgery scar that goes from one ear to the other across my neck like a necklace, so it’s quite visible. At first I wore scarves (all winter), then I chose necklaces to cover the scar as much as possible during warm weather. After awhile, though, I began to just show my bare skin, and I rarely see anyone noticing the scar at all. I still see it myself every day when I look in the mirror, but most people are too busy thinking about other things to give me a close look.

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 28, 2018 at 11:06 am

      I’m chuckling because I think you’re right. While we maybe fussing about something, everyone else is thinking about their day, their kids or spouse, their job, the clothes they chose to wear that day, the plans they have after work. It goes on and on. I think in the end we just do what’s comfortable. For the longest time I wouldn’t consider baring my arms. I always found ways to wear sleeves in the summer. Not now. My arms are my arms and that’s just the way it is.

  • Reply
    Sandi
    August 28, 2018 at 6:28 am

    You look so beautiful in everything Brenda & your talent for putting your outfits together is amazing. Your face radiates your of life. And after reading your article, I am reminded of my deceased BC friend, Sarah, who always thought she & I were a matched set. I have no breast on the right and she had no breast on the left. She had the same lust for life that I see in you.

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 28, 2018 at 11:07 am

      Oh Sandi, I love this bookending of breasts. One to the left and one to the right. Too darn fun! I’m sorry you lost your friend but I’m so glad she lived a lusty life. xo

  • Reply
    La semaine d'une gourmette
    August 28, 2018 at 6:56 am

    When a decolleté is too deep for my taste, especially if I wear it to work, I wear a same-color cami under it. I have many very cheap Primark camis, most of them black, but also a white one, a red one and a bright pink one (my favorite colors), with a straight front line, that “cut” a deep V-line ver nicely.

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 28, 2018 at 11:08 am

      Excellent solution to that low neck issue!

  • Reply
    sophia
    August 28, 2018 at 7:07 am

    I have a scar on my back, so no low cut backs for me anymore. I have a scar on my leg, so no short shorts. My battle scars need not be a banner of unless I choose it to be and I don’t. Natalie Wood always wore a cuff on on her left wrist due to a protruding bone. Everyone usually has something. But the self concious/discomfort level is very personal. So, to each their own.

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 28, 2018 at 11:10 am

      You’re right, to each their own. I never knew that about Natalie Wood. Gosh I’m glad I brought up this topic. The discussion is wonderful! Thanks for this, Sophia!

  • Reply
    Kathleen O'Brien
    August 28, 2018 at 8:02 am

    I accept myself, but unfortunately others are often nosy and make comments. I have large and promenent scars on my knees and legs from multiple operations dues to both knees being replaced. I don’t care when I go to swim therapy ’cause many folks there have those kinds of issues. However, on the street, I wear pants and leggings to cover and tights in the colder months. Also long skirts cover as well. I never wear shorts, I wasn’t big on those before the scars anyway. I’m not ashamed, I just prefer not to show them off.
    What’s alway weird to me is complete strangers have made comments. I would no more make personal comments to someone I didn’t know than take a trip to the moon. Why/how would someone feel they can do that? It’s so surprising to me. I want to be as rude and say “none of your business” but have just said “multiple operations”. One friend has said to nosy nellies about her scars “bear attack” – the look on their face was priceless!

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 28, 2018 at 11:16 am

      Oh, this is funny! A bear attack! I have no idea why people say those kind of things. Do you mind if I share something kind of funny? It’s something I said out loud that I probably should have kept inside. You wouldn’t believe how many people find out you are a fraternal twin and then ask you if you’re identical. My fraternal twin is a male. I didn’t give this answer to a total stranger, he was actually a friend who should have known better as he had fraternal twins. (Don’t hate me for what I’m about to say.) About being identical or not, I said with a straight face, “No, my penis is longer than his.” He did laugh and he did ponder why he’d asked that question. I’ll be kinder next time but it felt kind of good to spit out the obvious, at least once. Bear attack. That’s a good one!

  • Reply
    Nelda M Pattillo
    August 28, 2018 at 8:12 am

    I love the higher v-neck tops! However, I don’t see too many! I’m hiding a motley, sun damage (years of Florida sun damage)! I think that we all should wear what we love, no matter what others think!!

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 28, 2018 at 11:01 am

      I love your attitude, Nelda! Thanks for sharing your experience.

  • Reply
    Vicki W Grant
    August 28, 2018 at 8:23 am

    I’m the riddle of how can you have three mastectomies? (Lose one of the post cancer reconstructions to infection) My post radiation skin is shot, bras and breast forms used only on special occasions because of discomfort. However, since I sew, this opens up all sorts of design opportunities for when I want to go -ahem-“asymmetric.” Drapes and folds of shorter cowl necks with fabric that ‘move’, asymmetric folds on the empty side, dark colors and especially darker colors with prints reduces the obviousness.

    It’s find your lemonade where you can: A big shirt with a big pocket on the left side means I can actually use the pocket.

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 28, 2018 at 11:01 am

      Vicki, I wish I had your talent and expertise! You are so creative! I learned something new today: that it’s possible to have three mastectomies! I love your lemonade solutions. Thanks so much for sharing them!!!

  • Reply
    Tanya Lochridge
    August 28, 2018 at 8:42 am

    Isn’t it sad how we do all we can to hide the scars that decorate our bodies — that tell our stories, in a way. I have spent the better part of my life hiding three scars on my lower tummy — one pretty much goes from hip bone to hip bone, the other two are slightly smaller yet noticeable. All three are the result of exploratory and corrective surgeries I had in my early twenties. I disguised mine with one-piece bathing suits, which were pretty much my norm before any of the surgeries. The hard part came in my post-divorce dating years — feeling like I needed to explain and softly apologize for my scars as a relationship progressed. I even went so far so and met with a cosmetic surgeon to see what could be done to minimize the look. Luckily, he looked at me like I was nuts, telling me they were all just a part of my life and asked why I was ashamed of them. I won’t bore you with the psychological warfare that took place in my mind…but I will say that doc gave me a lot to think about and to this day I am grateful for his honesty. As much as I love all the social connection we have access to these days, sadly we are living in a time where filters, photoshopping and actual medical procedure to look more perfect s are the norm — we are taught to hide our personal characteristics from the world. I am just hoping that at some point in the future men and women will just say enough…enough and proudly wear their “badges of courage and survival” and that others will accept it as normal.

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 28, 2018 at 11:21 am

      This is a priceless story! I love what your doctor said. You’re right, we do have ways to “correct” things we don’t like in photos and of course there are surgical procedures. I am one person who actually misses how an actress used to look before surgery. I look at her and try to replace her face with the one she had before. I know that’s a choice too and it’s a personal one. I have friends who are so happy with their surgeries and they look great. Personally, I’m still in the au natural camp….maybe because I don’t have patience for recovery times! Thanks so very much for your share, Tanya.

  • Reply
    Mary
    August 28, 2018 at 9:30 am

    Hats off to all you brave women!

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 28, 2018 at 11:21 am

      Thanks, Mary!!

  • Reply
    Barbara Kraus
    August 28, 2018 at 9:58 am

    Brenda, I appreciate knowing about radiation scars. I didn’t know about them even though I have friends who have had radiation. Sharing brings us all closer together.

    I hide my upper arms. Recently I put a lacy shrug under a dressy sleeveless top for a special occasion.

    • Reply
      Brenda
      August 28, 2018 at 11:23 am

      Good for you on the lace shrug! And just to add about radiation scars: not everyone gets them. I got the impression that this one on me was more unusual than usual. But I’ve never done a survey! I bet your shrug looked great!

  • Reply
    Lois Detraglia
    August 28, 2018 at 11:29 am

    Thank you for sharing such a personal post. I know exactly where you are coming from, my sister. You always look gorgeous and are a breath of sunshine to your readers.

  • Reply
    Angela
    August 28, 2018 at 12:58 pm

    Mine is a partial mastectomy which, at the time, I decided against having reconstructed. Forward 20 years and hindsight would have persuaded me to have a reduction on the other side. The aging process (larger & droopier) has unbalanced me far greater than the first few post surgery years. “Chicken fillets” help a little but I find most tops creep to one side. With my darling husband always lovingly describing my badge of courage as “leftie”, I have gone forward with the attitude “older but bolder”.

  • Reply
    Cathy D.
    August 28, 2018 at 2:29 pm

    Brenda, I admire you so much for bringing up this topic. Most people wouldn’t have the courage to name, much less show, their blemishes. While I don’t have an actual scar, I do have a physical problem that cannot be hidden. I torn a tendon in my left foot and as a result must always wear sneakers. Not just any kind of sneaker, but ones designed for people who overpronate. I’ve tried to make sneakers my signature and collect them in different colors. This has worked surprisingly well. It’s fascinating to see how you and your readers deal with different beauty problems.

  • Reply
    Tami Coxen
    August 28, 2018 at 2:48 pm

    My hat is off to all of the courageous women here and to you, Brenda, for providing a forum to share! Plus I loved the fraternal twin story. What a hoot! You look happy and fun!

  • Reply
    Trinnie q
    August 29, 2018 at 12:42 am

    You darling brave warriors! I have two scars from pacemaker and new batteries insertions, I don’t really bother to hide them ! Shark attack’ is my line! Admittedly, only a baby shark! Sending much love to all you darlings , from Oz

  • Reply
    Jody
    August 29, 2018 at 6:35 am

    Brenda, I’ve been following your posts for several months now. I’ll be retiring in a year and am looking for fashion inspiration once i purge my closet of work wear. One silly concern I have when I retire is getting into a rut of pulling on schlumpy (yes that is a word–or my word anyway) clothes, no make up and who cares hair. So you have been elected as my inspiration! I love your style and your explanation of why and how an oufit works.

    • Reply
      Brenda
      September 4, 2018 at 11:15 am

      Jody, it is my pleasure to have been elected to this position! Do not fear, you’ll have plenty of fun with your wardrobe once you’ve retired. Stay tuned!

  • Reply
    Ann Werries
    August 29, 2018 at 9:39 am

    I wish my actions always matched my attitude…I truly do believe that we should “wear what we want” but I am uncomfortable showing my many scars from being very obese 35 years ago….I lost my weight but not the many stretch marks that happened before….and now with age, more jiggly bits in spite of 30 plus years of weight maintenance and weight lifting. So, I cover my upper arms, no matter how hot it is unless I’m in swimwear or walking for exercise. As I now live in a very arid hot climate, finding jackets that don’t make me look crazy was a challenge. I have 2 neutral linen jackets that can work over casual … and I do wear them. Most people who don’t know me just assume I’m cold in the a/c….only a few people know about my self conciousness and my weight loss. I appear confident and act confidently, but only because I dress comfortably for myself. That way, I can project outwardly the confidence I feel, mostly….
    Thank you Brenda, and others, for sharing your dressing secrets….

  • Reply
    Laurice Gilbert
    August 29, 2018 at 5:14 pm

    I don’t like the shape of my calves, so I almost never have bare legs. Skinny jeans, leggings and tights distract the eye from, and cleverly disguise, the actual shape, and I can feel comfortable in the short skirts/dresses/tunics I love.

    On a completely other level, I can’t believe it’s been 14 years! I ‘discovered’ you not long before your diagnosis, and was really sad to read your reports, then missed Tips and Teasers until you were ready to come back. I’m eternally thankful that you survived, and I view your damaged chest as a badge of honour and courage. You remain my style icon and virtual mentor all these years later (even though I now dress more like Suzanne #airofdistinction than Brenda these days). I’ve learned such a lot from you, and I often think how much I would have missed out on if things had gone differently, as they so often did in previous generations. Thank you for sharing this story.

    And I love the new hair! I’m going to take your picture into my hairdresser next time and ask for that same sassy shaggy asymmetrical look – it’s awesome!

  • Reply
    Aless
    August 29, 2018 at 11:45 pm

    I’ve always been very particular about my hair looking ‘right’ (i.e. the way I like it), especially having the grey covered with a permanent colour identical to my natural colour (dark brown). I have been putting up with re-colouring my hair every 5 weeks (it grows very fast) for 40 years, usually doing it myself- something I DETEST doing!!!!!!
    Recently, I noticed that my re-growth was a silvery colour, rather than grey, so I finally gave myself the permission to ‘go grey’ as we say here in Oz. My hairdresser helped by adding small sections of my usual hair colour to some of the regrowth, over three cutting appointments. Then she just cut it, with lots of chipping-in (my hair is very thick), for the next 3 cuts. While it was multi-hued, I just went serenely about my business, surprised to even get compliments!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Well, yesterday was THE cut that allowed the silver streaks to shine through, and I wanted to hug my reserved hairdresser (but restrained myself). I absolutely LOVE the look- streaks of shiny silver with dark brownish-grey. I’ve even been encouraged by trawling the ‘net to use styling product and muss the short cut all over the place- something I’ve always wanted to do! I’m feeling quite sassy……

  • Reply
    Laurel Armstrong
    August 30, 2018 at 6:34 am

    As a double mastectomy woman from 20 years ago I totally support the approach to dressing without having to tell the story to anyone. That’s in the past and I’m focused on right now. I create my own bras to provide just enough shape to make clothing fit my shape. I love funky tops, sew lots of wow colourful scarves and look for unusual jewellery – in short I have fun with my wardrobe.
    Your story is a positive one and I thank you sincerely for reminding us to focus on the now, and build/rebuild our confidence for today and the future.
    Thanks!

    • Reply
      Brenda
      September 4, 2018 at 11:13 am

      Your comment has left me with chills. You are reading my mind. I too want to be looking forward, not backward so most days and times, I will do what I can to not make the subject come up. I love hearing about your fun with fashion. Yes, yes, yes!!! You are inspiring others to do the same.

  • Reply
    Judy
    August 30, 2018 at 6:35 am

    Love your style and attitude, Brenda! You have great ideas for me as I learn to dress after a mastectomy. Thank you for sharing.

    • Reply
      Brenda
      September 4, 2018 at 11:13 am

      Judy, there are lots of great solutions. Cheers to you and the great outfits you’ll come up with. Hugs!

  • Reply
    Cindy Scurry
    August 30, 2018 at 10:50 am

    Your writing is so good! I love hearing about your outfits. Your styling solution is spot on! Lookin good babe!

    • Reply
      Brenda
      September 4, 2018 at 11:11 am

      Hey, thanks Cindy!!! xo

  • Reply
    LA CONTESSA
    August 30, 2018 at 3:04 pm

    YES, always long to cover those veins!!!!!!

  • Reply
    Sandra Sallin - Apart From My Art
    August 30, 2018 at 4:25 pm

    Ha! I thought you were going to write about how to deal with bosomy busts. Surprise. Yes, I’ve got very busty breasts. Too late to have them made smaller. But my face is covered by scars. I wrote about wearing red lipstick so that people would look at the lipstick and not at the scars from skin cancer surgery. I have a big bump from one of my surgeries that I’m very aware of. It shows up in some photos and I take care of it in photoshop. In real life I doubt people give it more than a momentary thought.Oh and I have a large white on at my hairline. But I forget to worry about it. If we get to this age and we’re lucky we have some dang scaring somewhere. I think your solution is perfect. I also think letting people know is perfect also. Now I know and now I won’t think anything of it. We’re all lucky to be alive. Plus you’re so beautiful I don’t think people think twice or care. Most people are more concerned about themselves. You just keep on writing and showing up!

    • Reply
      Brenda
      September 4, 2018 at 11:10 am

      Sandra, you are an angel to me! Such spirited thoughts! I NEVER noticed your face covered by scars. And I never noticed the big bump either. You are so dazzling and your eyes are always glistening and dancing with your next thought. Charmed, charmed, charmed. And you keep writing and showing up as well. I LOVE your blog posts!!! Hey, everyone, head over to http://www.apartfrommyart.com for some outrageous true stories from Sandra’s life, told with such wit and warmth. You’ll fall in love with her in a nano second!

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